Stratasan Blog

Avoid Healthcare Map Missteps by Properly Using Legends, Titles, Scale Bars, and Sources

Most people who see healthcare maps every day don’t give much thought to their content and cartographic execution. Titles display the purpose of a healthcare map, scale bars display distance, sources explain where the data originated, and legends identify the attributes on a map. All of these cartographic elements combined embody the important final touches that make healthcare maps readable and useful. Cartographic elements help those looking at the map understand the various layers and data without having to concentrate, ask questions, or decipher. This is why the choices made on the final touches of healthcare maps are the most essential part of the map-making process.

How to Make the Right Data-Driven Decisions: The Secrets of the DIKW Pyramid

Have you ever heard of the DIKW pyramid?  If not, you’re not alone. If you’re up for a refreshing shift in perspective on how to make data-driven decisions, read on...

July Webinar: Bridging the Gap between your Strategic Plan + Marketing Execution

Announcing our July Webinar

Bridging the Gap Between Your Strategic Plan + Marketing Execution

 

Choosing the Right Data Source for your Physician Relations Program

In the modern healthcare landscape, the need for reliable physician intelligence and a strategic physician relations strategy is only continuing to grow. With 32 million newly insured Americans entering the healthcare system as a result of the Affordable Care Act and a physician shortage—projected to climb to more than 90,000 by 2020—healthcare providers must have a comprehensive understanding of the physician relationships within their market, the available service line opportunities, and an accurate measure of inbound and outbound patient trends in order to stay ahead of the growing healthcare need.

When building a physician relations strategy, it is important for healthcare providers to be tapped into a reliable data source and a trustworthy physician referral tool. An understanding of the datasets available and reasons why certain physician tools use certain datasets can empower you to make the right decision in the tool that will best suit your needs.

Using the best available data can provide a clear roadmap for health providers focused on strategic growth. By fostering effective communication with physicians, relations experts can identify trends, issues, and opportunities and ultimately improve the overall quality of patient care delivered to their service area by accurately understanding the market needs. There are three main data sources to consider. Use of one or more of these datasets can be helpful when building a well-rounded physician relations strategy.

Best Practices in Physician Relations

Interviews with: Mitzi Kent and Dustie Maguire

Originally shared as a webinar, on April 12, 2016, this interview with Stratasan and LifePoint Health discusses the organization of physician relations, goals and responsibilities, hiring and leadership, relationship building techniques, intelligence and information, and compliance. You can see presentation slides and hear the audio from the webinar presentation here.

 

 

Best Practices for Physician Recruitment and Data Sensitivity

The misuse of physician recruitment data has become big business for the Department of Justice. Since January 2009, the DOJ has recovered a total of more than $25 billion through False Claims Act cases, with more than $16 billion of that amount recovered in cases involving fraud against federal healthcare programs. In the face of this increasing enforcement activity, thoughtful understanding and appropriate implementation of referral and recruitment data is more important than ever.  

3 Takeaways on the State of Healthcare in D.C.

Lessons Learned with Leadership Health Care

 

This past week I attended the Nashville Health Care Council’s Leadership Health Care Delegation in Washington D.C. We heard from members of Congress, administration officials, capitol hill staff, and national thought leaders as they discussed key health care policy issues, federal health care spending priorities, and reform implementation. Below are my top three takeaways from the trip.

Hospital Pay Cuts: Breaking Down the HAC Scoring System

with Christian Nicholl, and Hank Neuhoff

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The Affordable Care Act was implemented to ensure that patients would have access to affordable, high quality, and safe healthcare. Regulations and measures were put in place to make certain that hospitals were meeting these newly implemented standards of care and safety. These standards, known as the Health-Acquired Conditions (HAC) requirements, have led to more in-depth scrutiny into whether hospitals are truly doing everything they can to reduce preventable infections and patient death through unnecessary complications.

Best Practices for Managing Not-for-Profit Tax Requirements

 

Not-for-profit hospital tax exemptions are under fire. Last week ModernHealthcare.com published an article on the Illinois 4th District Appellate Court ruling about a 2012 Illinois law that declares what hospitals have to do to achieve tax exemptions is unconstitutional. The law, when passed in 2012, was seen as a huge benefit for not-for-profit hospitals who now had clear standards of how to maintain their tax-exempt status. The case will go to the Illinois Supreme Court for the final ruling.

As cities and states look for additional tax revenues to run city and state budgets, not-for-profit hospitals are a big source of new revenue. Hospitals in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey have also faced challenges.

Jackpot! Why Winning the Lottery Won’t Change Our Data

With the three big winners in last night’s lottery splitting such a large pot, the income-level demographic data for where they live will be effected. However, depending on the way you look at this effect, there will either be slight changes if any, or there will be a large change. The reason for this difference is that demographic datasets supply both mean and median household incomes.